Adult Ficton & Non Fiction

The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood

From Amazon.com:

I wish I could give this one more than five stars. The Blind Assassin is a fantastic, fabulous novel and I cannot recommend it highly enough. Margaret Atwoood has written a terrific story told in such a way that the reader will always be kept guessing as to what the true “truth” is. It is a mystery, with a death, but it is not a “mystery novel” as we come to expect. The Blind Assassin is the story of two sisters: Laura and Iris Chase. Laura died in what may or may not have been a suicidal car crash in 1945. Iris tells the story of her family and the events leading up to Laura’s death, reflecting in the present on the events of the past. What is so fascinating about The Blind Assassin is that things are not always what they seem, but there are layers upon layers of story, of truth.

We, the Drowned by Carsten Jensen

Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. An international hit, this bold seafaring epic spans 100 years in the lives of the men and women from a small town on an island off the Danish coast. Starting with the war between Germany and Denmark in 1848 and continuing through WWII, the men of Marstal sail, fight, trade, and die at sea while the women raise their children and wait for their husbands’ and sons’ uncertain return. The story loosely follows one family, the Madsens, beginning with the legendary Laurids Madsen, “best known for having single-handedly started a war,” and then his son, Albert, and a boy named Knud Erik, whom Albert takes under his wing. From adventures on the storm-ravaged seas and in exotic lands, to battles in town over the shipping industry and family life, dozens of stories coalesce into an odyssey taut with action and drama and suffused with enough heart to satisfy readers who want more than the breakneck thrills of ships battling the elements. By the time readers turn the final page, they will have come to intimately know this town and its sailors who tear out across an unforgiving sea.

Ed King by David Guterson

Seattle Times Best Book of the Year

In Seattle of 1962, Walter Cousins, a mild-mannered actuary takes a risk of his own and makes the biggest error of his life: He sleeps with Diane Burroughs, the sexy, not-quite-legal British au pair who’s taking care of his children for the summer. When Diane becomes pregnant and leaves their baby on a doorstep, it sets in motion a tragedy of epic proportions. The orphaned child, adopted by an adoring family and named Edward Aaron King, grows up to become a billionaire Internet tycoon and an international celebrity—the “King of Search”—who unknowingly, but inexorably, hurtles through life toward a fate he may have no way of reversing.

Sweeping, propulsive, and darkly humorous, Ed King re-imagines one of the world’s greatest tragedies—Oedipus Rex—for our own era, bringing contemporary urgency to a tale that still has the power to shock and inform.  Amazon.com review

Robert B. Parker’s Blackjack by Robert Knott

“Fans of the late Robert B. Parker’s best-selling novels about territorial marshals Virgil Cole and Everett Hitch will be delighted to discover a new adventure written by famed author Robert Knott.” —Cowboys & Indians Magazine – Amazon.com

Saving Grace by Jane Green

Powerful and riveting, Jane Green’s Saving Grace will have you on the edge of your seat as you follow Grace on her harrowing journey to rock bottom and back. – Amazon.com

The Mangle Street Murders by M.R. C. Kasasian

Amazon reader review:  ”How do I love this book? Let me count the ways. I love its sharp, witty voice. Its brisk pace. Its mordant humor. Its vision of 1880s London, a place of huge energy and just as huge contrast. Its echoes of the penny dreadfuls of the Victorian period, and its marriage of them with a sensibility that is entirely satisfying to a modern reader. Its perfectly matched pair of sleuths, who spar constantly yet share a genuine affection. Its wonderful secondary characters, notably Harriet Fitzgerald and Inspector Pond. Its sardonic homage to Doyle (who makes a cameo appearance) and Holmes (who is modeled, the book posts, on its own detective, Sidney Grice). Its unexpected plot twists and its evolving backstory.”

James Patterson’s The Murder House by David Ellis

Amazon reader review: ” This book was so suspenseful that I actually tore off a couple of fingernails. One of the best stand alone books so far! I did not guess the ending. I also didn’t get much housework done because I could not put the book down. Excellent writing style, good character development and fast paced just the way I like my books to be.”

Tom Clancy Commander in Chief: A Jack Ryan Novel by Mark Greaney

Amazon reader review:  Though it remains difficult not to compare Greaney’s novels to original Clancy works, he has done a surprisingly good job of reinvigorating the franchise. They hit on many of the Clancy trademarks: thrilling writing, plot twists, espionage, and some good old fashioned butt kicking. Commander in Chief (also known as the 11th Jack Ryan novel) hits just as well.

The Crossing by Michael Connelly

“A classic whodunit…an extra treat for the reader is being able to follow the case from the dual perspectives of the prosecution and the defense… Brothers Bosch and Haller may be, but at times they seem a lot like an ego and its id.”
Marilyn StasioNew York Times Book Review

Make Me by Lee Child

Amazon.com review – “The reigning champ ups the ante. . . . Yes, there’s breakneck action, but what gives this one its zing is the multilayered plot. . . . The beguiling Chang offers a new treat for series fans as well, and a surprise at the end will keep readers short of breath until the next installment begins.”Booklist (starred review)